Swarm satellites mapping the Earth's magnetic field

DTU Space leads Danish research results in 2014

Monday 05 Jan 15

Contact

Shfaqat Abbas Khan
Professor
DTU Space
+45 45 25 97 75

Contact

Nils Olsen
Professor -head of Geomagnetism
DTU Space
+45 45 25 97 08

Contact

Torsten Neubert
Chief Consultant
DTU Space
+45 45 25 97 31

Contact

John Leif Jørgensen
Professor and Head of Measurement and Instrumentation
DTU Space
+45 45 25 34 48

SWARM over the Earth

Swarm. Copyright: ESADTU Space is leading the international cooperation on the satellite mission Swarm to map Earth's magnetic field with unprecedented precision. The magnetic field is constantly changing, and it can have practical significance for air travellers and satellites. The three Swarm satellites was successfully launched the 22nd of November 2013 and are now on their mission to study changes of the magnetic field.

Read more

Division for Geodesy

Arctic sea-ice thickness for April 2013, as measured by CryoSat. Credit: Planetary Visions/CPOM/UCL/ESA

Main research areas: Maintenance and development of geodetic infrastructure and development of new techniques for surveying and mapping, such as GPS and Galileo. Refinement and improvement of space-based Earth Observation techniques.

Read more
The Danish technical monthly 'Ingeniøren' (The Engineer), has named two research projects from DTU Space amongst its top five research results of 2014, and it was a DTU Space project that was crowned the research breakthrough of 2014.


For the last ten years the magazine has compiled a list of the five most important research results by researchers in Denmark. This year the list includes two DTU Space projects: SWARM, the ESA satellite currently mapping the Earth's magnetic field in unprecedented detail, and  the long-term monitoring of the Greenland icesheet, which has been shown to be melting more rapidly than anticipated by current climate models. SWARM was pronounced the ultimate winner for 2014 from the list of the five most important results.

DTU Space's flagship project, the Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM), that will be mounted on the International Space Station, was also included in the magazine's summary of the year's most important scientific and technical projects.

The SWARM mission, launched in 2013, is a European Space Agency (ESA) project, which uses three satellites flying in formation. Two of DTU Space's professors, Nils Olsen and John Leif Jørgensen,  spearhead the project, to provide the scientific data analysis and to build the sensitive Vector Field Magnetometer (VFM) that makes the measurements.  Early results, presented for the first time in 2014, show that the mission is capable of delivering data that can describe the Earth's magnetic field in great detail, as well as following its variations with time. These data will benefit many technical fields in the coming years, such as oil drilling and tunnel digging.

DTU Space's researchers in the Division for Geodesi, have followed the Earth's sea and ice levels for many years. Now lecturer Abbas Khan and his international colleagues have determined that the Greenland icesheet is melting faster than predicted by current climate models. This result will likely have important repercusions in the future, as Abbas Khan says: "We are happy to be nominated, and I hope that this exposure will help people, especially politicians, to understand that the icesheet is melting alot faster than expected, and faster than predicted by the models, and we really should react to the problem now."

"We are happy to be nominated, and I hope that this exposure will help people, especially politicians, to understand that the icesheet is melting alot faster than expected, and faster than predicted by the models, and we really should react to the problem now"
Abbas Khan, lecturer, DTU Space

News and filters

Get updated on news that match your filter.
https://www.space.dtu.dk/english/news/2015/01/bestfiveof2014?id=6a8b3536-a648-4a31-8d8b-b1e05c463f97
29 JANUARY 2020